Designs

Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

By Ku-ring-gai Council

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

  • Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

    Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Program

About the project

To meet the needs of a growing population, Council has developed an innovative Open Space Acquisition Program (OSAP), which is providing much needed parkland for the community. Council has been acquiring land at an unprecedented rate, spending $33.4 million on acquiring 14,700 m2 of land for new parks and civic spaces in Gordon, Killara, Turramurra, St Ives and Wahroonga since 2007. Once complete, the program will deliver 10 new local parks and civic spaces within close proximity to high density residential areas in Ku-ring-gai.
In order to deliver the program council sort an exemption to the development contributions cap applied to Sydney council’s in 2009 by the Department of Planning and Infrastructure. Negotiations over a number of years, supported by numerous economic feasibility studies, resulted in the state government accepting our argument. The Ku-ring-gai Contributions Plan, which provides funding for the OSAP, was approved by the Minister for Planning in 2010. The Plan identifies approximately $63.7 million to be collected for the acquisition and design of new parks and civic spaces.

The Metropolitan Strategy requires Ku-ring-gai to accommodate 10,000 additional dwellings over the next 30 years; the majority of the new development is planned around the commercial centres. Introducing new residents into these areas presented Council with a challenge as the centres lack the characteristics that would make them desirable or healthy places to live. Council’s approach to this conundrum was to undertake an integrated urban design and planning process with the aim of creating a holistic vision that allows for growth while at the same time planning to improve the liveability of the town centres. Ku-ring-gai Council commenced the strategic planning process for its local centres in 2005 and completed the process in January 2013 with the gazettal of the Ku-ring-gai LEP (Local Centres) 2012. A key component of this process was open space planning.

The 2005 Ku-ring-gai Open Space Strategy1 identified that the LGA has a relatively low provision of local parks, further, the distribution of these open spaces is moderately uneven with low per capita provision in some areas – most notably the older subdivision areas along the highway including the commercial centres. The study identified that approximately 35% of households are beyond reasonable walking distance to any high quality neighbourhood park. It also notes the planned increase in population will place further demand on the open space system.

The Ku-ring-gai Open Space Acquisition Strategy2 (OSAS) was prepared to establish a series of principles for the acquisition of open space within Ku-ring-gai; the plan also identified priorities areas for acquisition so that Council’s efforts would be focused on the areas of greatest future need. The priority areas were around the main commercial centres. The Strategy was adopted by Council in 2007.

Following completion of the OSAS Council staff commenced detailed investigations within the high priority areas. This was done by examining walking catchment areas and quantifying the amount of existing open space and the existing and future population. The next step was to assess potential locations for new parks within each catchment where a shortfall was identified. The options were assessed against 24 criteria established in the OSAS. Preferred locations were identified for new parks these were then reported to Council for their approval. A number of these locations were subsequently zoned RE1 – Public Recreation under the KLEP 2012.

1 Prepared by Recreation Planning Associates
2 Prepared by Environmental Partnership (NSW) & Recreation Planning Associates

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