Designs

Salad Bar

By Turf Design Studio

  • Salad Bar

    Salad Bar

  • Salad Bar

    Salad Bar

  • Salad Bar

    Salad Bar

About the project

Exhibited in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney, the Salad Bar demonstrated how environmental sustainability could be practically incorporated into contemporary living. Salad Bar provides a modular vertical growing structure with a smaller footprint than the generic garden. Integrating a ‘bar’ within the vegetated wall provides a playful vision of how self sufficiency can be incorporated into contemporary urban living.
The Salad Bar featured in the 2004 Year of the Built Environment Future Gardens exhibition in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. The exhibition demonstrated how environmental sustainability could be practically incorporated into contemporary living. In 2005, the Salad Bar was invited to join the Houses of the Future exhibition at Sydney Olympic Park. The Salad Bar provides a modular vertical growing structure with a smaller footprint to the generic garden enabling it to occupy small spaces with the same square meter surface coverage. Integrating a ‘bar’ within the vegetated wall provides a playful vision of how self sufficiency can be incorporated into contemporary urban living.

The idea was born out of a brief that called for lateral thinking within the context of sustainability and the urban garden. Ideas such as; WSUD, recycling, biodiversity, and productive gardens, were put on the design table to be re-interpreted and re-arranged in new ways that would find a more harmonious balance between more compact forms of human habitation and the ecosystems that support it.

By recycling harvested rainwater the Salad Bar helps conserve this most precious resource. Collected water is stored in a central reservoir at the base of the wall. It is then reticulated by pumps into a drip irrigation system that feeds into soil pillows within each growing module.

Beyond its current form, the Salad Bar can be advanced as an integral part of our future urban environments, including residential, commercial and architectural applications.
With vertical gardens the sky really is the limit.

The Idea
The idea was born out of a brief that called for lateral thinking within the context of sustainability and the urban garden. Ideas such as; WSUD, recycling, biodiversity, and productive gardens, were put on the design table to be re-interpreted and re-arranged in new ways that would find a more harmonious balance between more compact forms of human habitation and the ecosystems that support it.

Water Recycling
By recycling harvested rainwater the Salad Bar helps conserve this most precious resource. Collected water is stored in a central reservoir at the base of the wall. It is then reticulated by pumps into a drip irrigation system that feeds into soil pillows within each growing module. The irrigation system is set on a timer that charges the system releasing just enough water to moisten each soil pillow.

Modulation
The modulated approach enables the Salad Bar to be adapted to suit a variety of spaces. Additionally, separate soil modules enable plantings to be “renovated” through removal and replanting according the seasons or based on sunlight and moisture requirements of individual species. Module sizes can be adapted to suit the aged who may be less able to till the earth, or children, who can plug and play with their own vegetable collections.

With vertical gardens the sky really is the limit.

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